LTAM Major Spotlight: Raina Enrique

The Latin American Studies Undergraduate major (LTAM) provides students with the opportunity to master multiple methodological skills and acquire the language competence through which to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the Latin American and Caribbean experience. In preparing students for public and private sector careers, LTAM alumni have gotten jobs in the U.S. State Department in a number of different Latin American countries, transnational companies that operate in the US and Latin America, and in non-profit organizations that work with migrants in the United States.

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Raina Enrique, class of 2017

We had the pleasure of sitting down with Raina Enrique, class of 2017 LTAM and Psychology double major, who departs for Peru August 2017 to serve in the Peace Corps.

Originally from Orlando, Florida, Enrique entered UNC Chapel Hill as an undergraduate student in 2013 and took LTAM 101. She was quickly inspired to pursue the major.

“It was like a match lit within me,” Enrique said. “I learned things I had never been exposed to before.”

With personal ties and interests in Latin America, Enrique identified with the subject and wanted to pursue learning more about LTAM history, politics, and perspectives, which included not only how the United States saw Latin America, but also how Latin America saw the United States. She quickly developed a passion for the region, and sought out an international experience to study Yucatec Maya abroad.

“Going to Mexico was my first time leaving the country,” Enrique said. ” Once I was there, it clicked with me and the experience really tweaked my passion.”

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Enrique received a FLAS award to study a second summer in the Yucatan.

Enrique liked the Yucatec Maya program so much, she went again as a FLAS recipient. Having had such a transformative experience learning an indigenous language and culture, Enrique applied to the Peace Corps with the intent on working with indigenous populations in Latin America.

“I loved the culture, the story, and the history,” Enrique said. “I still use my Maya today when I talk to my friends.”

In applying for the Peace Corps, Enrique requested to work with indigenous populations in Latin America. She will officially get that chance as she accepted an opportunity to serve in Peru as a Peace Corp youth development facilitator. In this position, Enrique will also add a fifth language of Quechua to her already existing skills in Portuguese, Spanish, Maya, and English.

Although she has not yet graduated, Enrique is looking ahead. She hopes to eventually earn a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology after taking this spring’s APPLES Global Course Guanajuato. Enrique said the LTAM major gave her the flexibility to tailor her interests in the Maya region and Mexico, and pull from many departments for a well-rounded perspective. Overall, Enrique said the LTAM major is enriching to learning.

“Not only is LTAM one of the majors that will change your perspective, it will also subsequently change your heart,” Enrique said.

Thank you for speaking with us, Raina! We look forward to the great things you will do!
ABOUT FLAS@UNC

FLAS fellowships fund the study of less commonly taught languages and area studies coursework. This program provides academic year and summer fellowships to assist graduate students and advanced undergraduates in foreign language and area studies. The goals of the fellowship program include: (1) to assist in the development of knowledge, resources and trained personnel for modern foreign language and area/international studies; (2) to stimulate the attainment of foreign language acquisition and fluency; and (3) to develop a pool of international experts to meet national needs.

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.

“Memory is the strength of our resistance”: A performance geography of peace, memory, and territory in the San José Peace Community, Colombia

“Memory is the strength of our resistance:”

A performance geography of peace, memory, and territory in the San José Peace Community, Colombia

Department of Geography Doctoral Candidate Chris Courtheyn performs his research with the Peace Community of San José de Apartadó

Monday, November 2nd
6:00 – 7:30 pm
Gerrard Hall
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


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The Peace Community is group of small-scale farmers in the Urabá region of Colombia that have resisted forced displacement and co-optation by state, paramilitary, and guerrilla forces since 1997.

Through a series of critical and performative ethnographic pieces titled “If we remain on the land,” “Even the stones speak,” “We will stay if…”, and “Peace does not come from them,” this event will perform the ways this community creates and lives peace through food sovereignty, embodied and material memory practices, and transcommunal solidarity networks.

Sponsored by the Critical and Performance Ethnography Working Group, Carolina Performing Arts, Graduate Certificate in Participatory Research, Institute for the Study of the Americas, Curriculum in Global Studies, and the Department of Geography.

Searching for Site Q: Exploration, Archaeology, and Decipherment at La Corona, Guatemala

Searching for Site Q: Exploration, Archaeology, and Decipherment at La Corona, Guatemala
The George E. Stuart Memorial Lecture
Thursday, October 1, 2015

Wilson Special Collections Library
5:30 p.m. Viewing of the exhibition Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas
6:00 p.m. Program

Free and open to the public
Information: Liza Terll, Friends of the Library, (919) 548-1203

An archaeological mystery will be the subject of the George E. Stuart Memorial Lecture at UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library on October 1. David Stuart, a scholar of Maya writing, will tell the story of the discovery of “Site Q” in Guatemala. Now known as “La Corona,” it is one of the most interesting dynastic centers of ancient Maya civilization.

“Site Q” first came to the attention of archaeologists during the 1960s, when numerous ancient Maya sculptures appeared on the international art market. Archaeologists and art historians were unable to identify a ruin that could be the source of these works. Looters had plundered from a mystery site that came to be known by archaeologists as “Site Q,” for “question.”

In 1997, a team of archaeologists, including David Stuart, set out to investigate an unnamed site in northern Guatemala. Upon entering the ruins, Stuart realized that he was in Site Q, and he named the ruins “La Corona.” Today La Corona is the center of intensive archaeological and epigraphic research and has yielded important new discoveries.

Stuart is the David and Linda Schele Professor of Mesoamerican Art and Writing at the University of Texas at Austin. In 1984, he became at age 18 the youngest person to receive a MacArthur fellowship. Stuart has published widely on the archaeology and epigraphy of ancient Maya civilization. His books include The Order of Days (Random House, 2011) and, with George E. Stuart, Palenque: Eternal City of the Maya (Thames & Hudson, 2008). He operates the blog Maya Decipherment.

Stuart is the son of the late Dr. George E. Stuart, who, along with his wife, Melinda Y. Stuart, donated his collection of nearly 13,000 volumes about archaeology and anthropology to the UNC Libraries in 2007. The Stuart Collection is particularly rich in materials related to the Maya.

Stuart’s lecture is sponsored by the Howren Fund of the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill. It complements Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas, the Rare Book Collection’s fall exhibition in the Melba Remig Saltarelli Exhibit Room of Wilson Library. Lecture attendees are invited to tour the exhibition beginning at 5:30 p.m. The free public exhibition will be on view through January 10, 2016.

– See more at: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/09/site-q/#sthash.cSJLfPx9.dpuf

Chronicles of Empire: Spain in the Americas

Sept. 14,2015 -Jan. 10,2016

Spain’s discovery, conquest, and settlement of the Western hemisphere is examined through the outstanding holdings in the Rare Book Collection, including the Bernard J. Flatow Collection of Latin American Cronistas, as well as other sixteenth- and seventeenth-century volumes. These early printed books demonstrate how the new graphic media communicated globally the story of Spain’s imperial enterprise, the first truly global empire. This exhibition is part of the Institute for the Study of the Americas commemoration: “One Hundred Years of Latin American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 1915-2015.”
Melba Saltarelli Exhibit Room, Wilson Special Collections Library, Visit for more information: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/2015/08/spain-empire/.