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John Stephens

Professor of Political Science
  Global Education Center 3211
  919-962-4634
  jdsteph@unc.edu



John D. Stephens, Gerhard E. Lenski, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology; Director, Center for European Studies, European Union Center of Excellence, and Trans-Atlantic Masters program; received his B.A. (1970) from Harvard University and his Ph.D. (1976) from Yale University. His main interests are comparative politics and political economy, with area foci on Europe, the Antipodes, Latin America, and the Caribbean. He teaches European politics and the political economy of advanced industrial societies. He is the author of The Transition from Capitalism to Socialism (1979) and coauthor of Democratic Socialism in Jamaica (with Evelyne Huber, 1986), Capitalist Development and Democracy (with Evelyne Huber and Dietrich Rueschemeyer, 1992; Outstanding Book Award, Political Sociology Section, ASA), Development and Crisis of the Welfare State (with Evelyne Huber, 2001; Best Book Award, Political Economy Section, APSA), and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (with Evelyne Huber, 2012, Outstanding Book Award, Sociology of Development Section, ASA). In 2019, he and Evelyne Huber received the Guillermo O’Donnell Democracy Award and Lectureship from the Latin American Studies Association. He has also contributed articles to, among others, The American Political Science Review, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, The British Journal of Sociology, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Journal of European Social Policy, and World Politics. John D. Stephens, Lenski Professor of Political Science and Sociology; Director, Center for European Studies; received his B.A. (1970) from Harvard University and his Ph.D. (1976) from Yale University. His main interests are comparative politics and political economy, with area foci on Europe, the Antipodes, Latin America, and the Caribbean. He teaches European politics and the political economy of advanced industrial societies. He is the author of five books including Capitalist Development and Democracy (with Evelyne Huber and Dietrich Rueschemeyer, 1992), Development and Crisis of the Welfare State (with Evelyne Huber, 2001), and Democracy and the Left: Social Policy and Inequality in Latin America (with Evelyne Huber, 2012). In 2019, he and Evelyne Huber received the Guillermo O’Donnell Democracy Award and Lectureship from the Latin American Studies Association.
John Stephens