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Indigenous Patrons and the Origins of Jesuit Education in Central Mexico, 1572 -1621

February 6, 2024

Indigenous Patrons and the Origins of Jesuit Education in Central Mexico, 1572 -1621

Speaker: Dr. Peter Villella

Date: February 15, 2024
Time: 3:30 – 5:00 PM

David Brading’s magisterial account explores the writings of Spanish conquerors, missionaries, and settlers across three and a half centuries to detail the deepest roots of patriotism and national identity in Latin America. Sweeping and erudite, it unpacks the diverse and often contradictory efforts of Spaniards and their American-born descendants to learn about and understand the lands, indigenous peoples, and folk cultures of their adopted countries. In doing so, Brading reveals how such thinkers communicated the essential symbols and ideas that would later shape nineteenth-century efforts to define nationhood and national belonging in Latin America.

After Stories: Transnational Intimacies of Postwar El Salvador

February 5, 2024

After Stories: Transnational Intimacies of Postwar El Salvador

Speaker: Professor Irina Carlota Silber, Ph.D

Date: March 4, 2024
Time: 6:00 PM
Address: Fedex Global Education Center Room 1005

Traveling across time and borders, Professor Silber’s research examines the memories and troubles of families in El Salvador during the postwar period and migration to the United States and how they offer us hope for the making of more just global futures.

This event counts as a Life Experience credit!


Global Career Night 2024

January 25, 2024

Global Career Night 2024

Speaker: Ntiense Inyan, Cait Dallaire, and Camilla Ihenetu

Date: February 21, 2024
Time: 5:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Hear from a panel of phenomenal UNC alumni in globally focused careers! Panelists represent a variety of career options: government, private industry, NGOs, and more. They will share their professional journeys from studying (like you!) at UNC, through the career searches, networking, and life choices that led them to their current roles. In the Q&A, panelists will take your questions on everything from advice on the job hunt to sustainable career growth over the years. Wherever you are in your UNC experience, this panel is perfect for you — from first years just starting to explore their interests, to seniors scrolling Handshake and attending job fairs.

This event is co-organized with the UNC Curriculum in Global Studies.
This event will take place in the Nelsen Mandela Auditorium. Catering by Mediterranean Deli will be offered in the atrium after the panel.


NCCLAS Day 2

January 22, 2024

NC Conference on Latin American Studies – Day 2

Date: February 24, 2024
Time: 8:30AM – 3:00PM
Address: Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599

The Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University and the Latin American Studies Program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte presents the fifth annual North Carolina Conference on Latin American Studies (NC/CLAS) hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on February 23-24, 2024. This in-person conference hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will take place at the Fedex Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.

The NC/CLAS 2024 program seeks to bring together scholars, specialists, and graduate students in North Carolina engaged in the diverse and multiple disciplinary domains dedicated to Latin American and Latino/a studies, past and present.

Register for the conference here by February 12, 2024 (pre-registration is required of all attendees, including all presenters).

Click the “Read More” button below for parking, registration, and schedule details. This event will count towards Campus Life Experience credits.

Funding for NC/CLAS 2024 is generously provided by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Christopher Reynolds Foundation, the UNC Charlotte Latin American Studies Program, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences.


NCCLAS 2024

January 22, 2024

NC Conference on Latin American Studies – Day 1

Date: February 23, 2024
Time: 12:30PM – 7:30PM
Address: Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599

The Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University and the Latin American Studies Program at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte presents the fifth annual North Carolina Conference on Latin American Studies (NC/CLAS) hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on February 23-24, 2024. This in-person conference hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will take place at the Fedex Global Education Center, 301 Pittsboro Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.

The NC/CLAS 2024 program seeks to bring together scholars, specialists, and graduate students in North Carolina engaged in the diverse and multiple disciplinary domains dedicated to Latin American and Latino/a studies, past and present.

Register for the conference here by February 12, 2024 (pre-registration is required of all attendees, including all presenters).

Click the “Read More” button below for parking, registration, and schedule details. This event will count towards Campus Life Experience credits.

Funding for NC/CLAS 2024 is generously provided by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Christopher Reynolds Foundation, the UNC Charlotte Latin American Studies Program, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences.


This Art Belongs to the Artist Symposium

January 3, 2024

This Art Belongs to the Artist Symposium

Date: April 12, 2024
Time: 3:00PM – 7:00PM
Address: Hanes Art Center (tentative)

The exhibition will include a display of original art created at the GBDC from April 12-19, 2024 culminating in a symposium on April 12, 2024 to address the sovereign, and political, and legal dimensions of detainee art. The symposium speakers will include the virtual participation of several released detainee artists. Legal experts will address the inter-related international law issues and the paradox within claims to human rights, with a focus on art and the rights of detainees to own and control their creative work.

Through an art exhibition and a day-long symposium, this project aims to expand our understanding of the ongoing impact of state violence and the extralegal prison Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp through the framework of art and law.

Since GBDC’s opening in 2002, the U.S. has detained 780 individuals, the vast majority of whom have been released without charge. Those who have been released are often transferred to countries pursuant to secret agreements and have been rendered “stateless.” These detainees are largely Middle Eastern, including Afghans, Saudi Arabians, Yemenis, Pakistanis, and Algerians. The violation of detainees’ rights at GBDC has been well documented; these violations include detaining people indefinitely without trial, using extreme interrogation methods including sleep deprivation, simulated drowning, and other forms of physical and psychological torture.

Background on the former detainee artwork
Between 2009 and 2017, detainees at GBDC were provided with art supplies and allowed to participate in art classes. Much of this artwork was transferred from the Guantánamo Bay Detention Center to attorneys representing Guantánamo detainees. Some detainees were permitted to claim some of their art upon their release. In late 2017, however, after a series of successful curated showings of this art across the United States, detainees remaining in Guantánamo were prohibited from transferring their art and denied ownership of their work. After intervention by human rights advocates, including two UN Special Rapporteurs, detainees were granted a limited right to take some of their artwork as deemed by the government as “practicable” upon their release while remaining subject to government claims that the art remains the property of the United States.

Co-Sponsors: UNC Law School, Institute for the Study of the Americas, College of Arts and Sciences, Institute for Arts and Humanities, Art Department, Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies, Center for European Studies, Asian American Center, Beth Jacob/ Healing and Recovery after Trauma, Department of History, Department of Communications, Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies, Department of Women & Gender Studies, NC Stop Torture Now, Sociology Department, Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, and the Department of Romance Studies.

This Art Belongs to the Artist Exhibit

January 3, 2024

This Art Belongs to the Artist Exhibit

Date: April 12, 2024 – April 19, 2024

Address: Hanes Art Center (tentative)

Through an art exhibition and a day-long symposium, this project aims to expand our understanding of the ongoing impact of state violence and the extralegal prison Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp through the framework of art and law.

Since GBDC’s opening in 2002, the U.S. has detained 780 individuals, the vast majority of whom have been released without charge. Those who have been released are often transferred to countries pursuant to secret agreements and have been rendered “stateless.” These detainees are largely Middle Eastern, including Afghans, Saudi Arabians, Yemenis, Pakistanis, and Algerians. The violation of detainees’ rights at GBDC has been well documented; these violations include detaining people indefinitely without trial, using extreme interrogation methods including sleep deprivation, simulated drowning, and other forms of physical and psychological torture.

The exhibition will include a display of original art created at the GBDC from April 12-19, 2024 culminating in a symposium on April 12, 2024 to address the sovereign, and political, and legal dimensions of detainee art. The symposium speakers will include the virtual participation of several released detainee artists. Legal experts will address the inter-related international law issues and the paradox within claims to human rights, with a focus on art and the rights of detainees to own and control their creative work.

Background on the former detainee artwork
Between 2009 and 2017, detainees at GBDC were provided with art supplies and allowed to participate in art classes. Much of this artwork was transferred from the Guantánamo Bay Detention Center to attorneys representing Guantánamo detainees. Some detainees were permitted to claim some of their art upon their release. In late 2017, however, after a series of successful curated showings of this art across the United States, detainees remaining in Guantánamo were prohibited from transferring their art and denied ownership of their work. After intervention by human rights advocates, including two UN Special Rapporteurs, detainees were granted a limited right to take some of their artwork as deemed by the government as “practicable” upon their release while remaining subject to government claims that the art remains the property of the United States.

Co-Sponsors: UNC Law School, Institute for the Study of the Americas, College of Arts and Sciences, Institute for Arts and Humanities, Art Department, Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies, Center for European Studies, Asian American Center, Beth Jacob/ Healing and Recovery after Trauma, Department of History, Department of Communications, Center for Middle East and Islamic Studies, Department of Women & Gender Studies, NC Stop Torture Now, Sociology Department, Department of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, and the Department of Romance Studies.

South-South Migration: Cross-Border Dynamics and Education in Costa Rica

October 17, 2023

South-South Migration: Cross-Border Dynamics and Education in Costa Rica

Speaker: Dr. Ana Solano-Campos

Date: November 7, 2023
Time: 6:00 PM

In this lecture, Dr. Solano-Campos discusses Costa Rica’s profile as a top migrant-receiving country in Central America. In particular, the lecture addresses Nicaragua-Costa Rica cross-border dynamics, one of the most important South-South migration flows in the Central American region. After describing the historical context and shared bond between Costa Rica and Nicaragua, Dr. Solano-Campos turns to Costa Rica’s broad legal immigration framework and its implications for education policy, curriculum, and practices. Drawing from a critical year-long ethnography, Dr. Solano-Campos illustrates processes of migrant incorporation in a Costa Rican school.

Turned Back at the Border

October 11, 2023

Turned Back at the Border: The Situation of Central American Asylum Seekers in Mexico

Speaker: Joe Wiltberger

Date: October 30, 2023
Time: 6:00PM
Address: Room 1005, Global Education Center

Professor Joseph Wiltberger, University of California San Diego and El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, will speak as part of the Root Causes of Central American Migration Lecture Series. Wiltberger researches questions of migration, forced displacement, borders and human rights. He is currently co-leading a cross-border team of researchers from UC San Diego and El Colegio de la Frontera Norte to examine experiences of social inclusion and discrimination of migrants from Central America and the Caribbean who are living in Tijuana. He earned his PhD at Carolina from the Department of Anthropology.